• Announcements

    • zero

      Forum Updated   11/03/2015

      We just updated the forums. Among other things, selective quote is now live. You can just select the text that you want, and a option to "quote this" will appear. During the update we also broke the main theme files for some reason.  I just activated the backup theme files and dumped the custom CSS in (I'll clean it up later). If there are any issues with the site, please get in touch with @nytegeek or myself.
Alexandoy

Reasons for slow pc

44 posts in this topic

I sometimes experience the very slow reaction of my office computer which is running on XP. What I usually do is check on msconfig for some unnecessary application like the Google update. There are times that it worked, my pc would be back to its normal pace but there are times that the msconfig has no extra applications.

Aside from virus and  malware, do you have any ideas on what causes the slowdown?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aside from virus and  malware, do you have any ideas on what causes the slowdown?

​When was the last time you ran defrag on your computer? It's worth running defrag to keep your disk healthy. I hate using Windows because after a while, booting takes a hell of a long time.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huh, I have almost forgotten that word defrag, @zero. I guess that is the key to that slow pace of my computer. I understand the paging that occurs in virtual mode and depending on the available pages of the real memory vis-a-vis virtual memory, the operation and slow down or speed up. Thank you for that idea of defrag although I don't think I can do it in the next days because it takes a lot of time so I would be waiting for my slack time for the defragmentation of the master hard disk.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When running on XP, I loved to use TuneUp utilities. This software can detect and correct issues that are slowing down your system aside the need to defrag your whole hard drive from time to time.

From invalid registry entries, to improve your internet connectivity, this software is truly awesome to make your computer run significantly faster that it might be running today.

Check it out, http://www.tune-up.com/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How much RAM and what is the processor speed of your PC? It may be because it's an old computer and getting weary. But like others mentioned, occasional de-fragmentation, cleaning up would help to an extent.

I suggest you try using CCleaner. It's free and does most of the basic yet good cleaning. Also, try disabling system animations.

Here's a guide which I've followed when I had XP. I hope you find it useful!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paging shouldn't be an issue unless you are running memory intensive processes on a machine with less than 2 gigabytes of ram. If you are at or below 512 megabytes of ram the only good answer for you is more ram. Just keep in mind that disabling page files and clearing a browser cache to often will actually serve to slow a machine down in the long run.

Defragmentation is done automatically on Windows Vista and up unless you turn your computer off every night or have disabled the schedule for it, but on Windows XP you would need to set a schedule for it to happen on a regular basis without intervention. If you pull up defrag and find that the drive is heavily fragmented you may or may not get a performance boost by running it. If you are on a fat32 file system for some strange reason then yes, absolutely run defrag. If it is NTFS and not heavily fragmented it might not help. It depends on the age of the hard disk. Newer drives have faster reads and writes so fragmented files are less of an issue.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a slow pc is caused by having a lot of bloatware and viruses. I would run a virus check... After the viruses and bloatware are all removed, I would run disk cleanup to remove all the temp files and unnecessary files that might be slowing your pc down. Then, I would run a thorough disk error check on startup. And since it's a WIndows XP pc, I would finish it off with disk defragmenter. I think you would see an improvement after all that. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sometimes experience the very slow reaction of my office computer which is running on XP. What I usually do is check on msconfig for some unnecessary application like the Google update. There are times that it worked, my pc would be back to its normal pace but there are times that the msconfig has no extra applications.

Aside from virus and  malware, do you have any ideas on what causes the slowdown?

I recommend CCleaner as a maintenance tool for Windows. This little (and free) program can help you get rid of accumulated internet or file waste. I run CCleaner after Installs and Uninstalls and after major transferring.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recommend CCleaner as a maintenance tool for Windows. This little (and free) program can help you get rid of accumulated internet or file waste. I run CCleaner after Installs and Uninstalls and after major transferring.

I would have my assistant check that tool. Take note that our computers are running on XP. Thanks for the advice.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some reasons why it might be slow, virus has to be the number one reason, it can really consume a lot of resources. Other reason might be a lot of processes running. Finally, what's the RAM memory of the computer? Is it enough? 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some reasons why it might be slow, virus has to be the number one reason,

Actually a virus would be the least likely culprit. Other types of malware maybe but not likely a virus.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, virus, malware, I call it all virus, but yes, some malware is really hard to clean and can be a terrible headache. I just hope I don't come across any of those nasty ones that ruin my computer. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Viruses and malware are usually the first culprits for a slow PC. Since you're using XP, your computer is also likely from that era. Upgrading the RAM will do wonders to the performance of any old desktop. Recently I upgraded the RAM of an old desktop that my dad is using, performance more than doubled and my old man is one happy camper. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best option for dealing with Windows XP is a backup and a clean install of a newer operating system. That said, you need to be sure your hardware is sufficient for the upgrade. Depending on how old the computer is you could be looking at anything from more ram to a newer computer. If money is an issue there are lower cost alternatives for upgrading or replacing a computer depending on your needs.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really appreciate all the opinions on this thread. It makes me think that it has been a long time since I had formatted a hard disk, also a long time since I last installed an OS. Am I still up for that chore? Or it may give me a headache?

I understand about the bad tracks that I used to encounter when defragging. It definitely slows down when the file is physically scattered in segments on the surface of the hard disk. Maybe that's one of the culprit.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I understand about the bad tracks that I used to encounter when defragging. It definitely slows down when the file is physically scattered in segments on the surface of the hard disk. Maybe that's one of the culprit.

If you have bad clusters on the drive you should back anything up you need and replace the drive. No amount of software solutions is going to protect your data at that point.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would start with the simplest actions first. Run Malwarebytes and maybe Spybot: Search and Destroy to clean up any garbage. Then, try a defrag. If these don't help then I'd move on to bigger things. I always start with the simple stuff first though. No point in creating unnecessary headaches.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have bad clusters on the drive you should back anything up you need and replace the drive. No amount of software solutions is going to protect your data at that point.

Yes, a backup is SOP for me when doing something with the hard disk. By the way, a friend suggested an easier route in lieu of defragging. Get a clean hard disk and back up all your files. Format the old hard disk and if it is a system disk then install the OS. After that, copy back all the files and folders from the backup.

What do you think?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have bad clusters on the drive you should back anything up you need and replace the drive. No amount of software solutions is going to protect your data at that point.

Yes, a backup is SOP for me when doing something with the hard disk. By the way, a friend suggested an easier route in lieu of defragging. Get a clean hard disk and back up all your files. Format the old hard disk and if it is a system disk then install the OS. After that, copy back all the files and folders from the backup.

What do you think?

Is this a method you plan to use as a source of elimination? For example, add each item back and then make sure there are no problems. If a problem arises, you'll know which one is the culprit - is that the idea? Or, am I totally off with what you intend to do?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Yes, a backup is SOP for me when doing something with the hard disk. By the way, a friend suggested an easier route in lieu of defragging. Get a clean hard disk and back up all your files. Format the old hard disk and if it is a system disk then install the OS. After that, copy back all the files and folders from the backup.

What do you think?

That is actually not a good way to avoid fragmented files. There are reasons I would do that but they have nothing to do with file fragmentation. It is a lot of work when it would be easier to schedule a weekly defrag to run automatically. The method you are asking about could restore performance of windows to a more fresh state but it is only temporary. If you are still using all the same software the same way on the same hardware it will likely slow down on you again. If you really want or need to use a new drive best to get a new hard drive and install a newer OS. That is assuming that the rest of the specs on your machine are at or upgrade-able to the standards needed to run a newer operating system.

Edited by nytegeek
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This could be due to several reasons actually. If you could send us some of your hardware specs we would really love to help you more out. By the way these are some general tips & tricks:

  • Run an antivirus scan (avast,avg,avira,ecc...)
  • Clean your harddisk from useless files (CCleaner)
  • Remove from the startup useless programs
  • Increase your RAM size.
  • As a last chance buy an SSD, this will speed up the OS boot.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An SSD will definitely be a speed boost. Don't defrag it though.A decent size SSD can be pricey.  If you have the money to install a decent size SSD you may as well just upgrade your computer though. You mentioned it is an office computer right? If it is yours to invest in great, but if it is the property of a company you may just be stuck with clean up and whatever upgrades they will allow if any.

Edited by nytegeek
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, a backup is SOP for me when doing something with the hard disk. By the way, a friend suggested an easier route in lieu of defragging. Get a clean hard disk and back up all your files. Format the old hard disk and if it is a system disk then install the OS. After that, copy back all the files and folders from the backup.

What do you think?

Is this a method you plan to use as a source of elimination? For example, add each item back and then make sure there are no problems. If a problem arises, you'll know which one is the culprit - is that the idea? Or, am I totally off with what you intend to do?

My intention with backing up, formatting then restoring the folders one by one is to bypass the tedious process of defragging. A formatted hard disk starts from zero and all folder and files written in it will have a continuous cluster that is the ideal when it comes to speed of storage access.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I had to format my computer twice, but considering I have it almost 10 years now I have to say that formatting it twice in 10 years is not 10 bad. I upgraded it and it's like a lion, XP lion. :) 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My intention with backing up, formatting then restoring the folders one by one is to bypass the tedious process of defragging. A formatted hard disk starts from zero and all folder and files written in it will havea continuous cluster that is the ideal when it comes to speed of storage access.

 

I see. I had to go back. I missed the part about trying to avoid defragging. My bad. I've never had any serious issues with it myself. I'd prefer running a defrag to reformatting, but I guess that's just me.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By SundayDrivah
      I want to know if there is a way to prevent Windows from ending up in an infinite loop. I am using an IPad at this moment because my PC just got broken. No repair guy can't fix it and it is driving me nuts.

      I tried restarting my computer in safe mode, I tried using my repair CD for my Windows 7 but my computer is completely ruined. It seemed like I won't be able to fix PC and I have to buy a new one. I just want to know if there is way so my next PC will never end Union infinite loop. This is much more worst than Blue screen of death.

      I don't if there is a way the files on my hard disk can still be restored. My PC seemed to have overheated. I only use it 5 hours a day so I don't know why this travesty happened to me. My PC don't have any games on it. I only use it for surfing online. It has superior security so there is no way it is virus. Time for me to save some cash for a new PC.


    • By AlexKid
      Before the advent of the Xbox platform, Microsoft was seriously invested on the PC desktop market as a gaming platform. The Xbox 360 was a huge success for Microsoft, and it seems like they gradually lost interest in the PC gaming market. We all know how that went, Steam gradually cornered this market and have even got their own OS. One could argue that it was a huge mistake for Microsoft to neglect this market segment and are now paying the price. 
      I'm just wondering what your thoughts are on this. Should Microsoft invest and focus more of their resources into PC gaming again?
    • By butterfly
      Guys, my girlfriend just got a MacBook Air and it looks so sleek and cool sitting next to my clunky five-year-old Hewlett-Packard PC. I also see her doing all kinds of neat stuff with her mouse touchpad. Are Macs more than just cool to look at and fun to use. I've heard different sides of the debate? How do they compare to PCs in terms of functionality? Any insights?
    • By Patryk9595
      Hey, Is there any safe way to install Mac OS X on my PC. I've been looking for some information on the internet, but everytime they say it's risky, and drivers don't work. And also, when I buy Mac OS X, and install it on a PC, can I still use it legally, or it must be installed on MacBook?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 1 Guest (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online