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MyDigitalpoint

To Use or Not Use Flash on Linux

16 posts in this topic

Not being a Linux user made me unaware of issues that Linux users have when it comes to enable or disable Adobe Flash on their operating systems, if they ever manage to get flash running correctly.

At least is what I was reading just today, and thought to share the article with you in case you have ever faced this problem:

Linux without Flash: User Tips
What Linux users need to know about using - or not using - Flash.
By Matt Hartley

Adobe Flash has been both a gift and a curse wrapped up in the same package. It's a sluggish, often insecure and horribly bloated way to watch a video and play games on your computer. For years, Flash for Linux users was even worse: audio was out of sync with the video and you needed a special wrapper to play Flash videos on 64-bit Linux distributions. Even though things have gotten better in terms of compatibility, security still remains poor.

In this article, I'll examine the practicality of going without Flash, what sites still require it.

The case against Flash in Linux

Setting aside the recent security issues with Flash, there is also the matter of it no longer being actively supported under Linux. Yes, it's being patched for Linux users. And of course, Google's Chrome browser maintains their own variant of Flash called Pepper Flash. But if you prefer not to use Chrome, you're pretty much married to either using Adobe Flash's dated offering or forgoing Flash altogether.

Why in the world would anyone want to use a product like this to watch videos? As it turns out, no one does. Major websites have already begun the process of making sure HTML5 video elements are available instead of relying on Flash exclusively. The two major websites that come to mind are YouTube and Vimeo. Both will provide on-demand video playback with modern HTML5 video element supported browsers like Firefox...

Full article and tips on having flash working are available here, http://www.datamation.com/open-source/linux-without-flash-user-tips.html

 

 

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Thanks for the interesting article. In the recent years I haven't had an issue with Adobe Flash, still I avoided it as much as possible, mostly because the incredible amount of resources it demands. Fortunately with the adoption of HTML 5 we have now a better alternative to Flash. Of course there are a lot of sites that still use Flash, because of that I don't disable it from my computer.

You should try Linux, it's an incredible OS with amazing compatibility an stability. I advise you to start with Ubuntu because, in my opinion, is the easiest distribution to use and has a ton of documentation and a big supporting community.

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I have been making the case against Flash on any operating system for a number of years now. I even wrote an article over the matter for the Setuix blog. That said, I have always experienced more issues with it from Windows than Linux. Unless needed for work I see no good reason to even use Flash.

http://setuix.com/flash-must-die-make-way-for-better-standards/

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Interesting article @nytegeek, besides I must say thanks for explaining to us how to get this annoying plugin disabled. You know it comes already packed with Google Chrome so I have been facing hard times getting it crashing over and over.

I believe problems with Flash began when Adobe took over Macromedia because it wasn't so annoying in the early days. Now to make it worst, it installs two versions Flash NPAPI, and Flash PPAPI based on the browser you are using and therefore installing both when you have to use multiple browsers for testing purposes.

You should try Linux, it's an incredible OS with amazing compatibility an stability. I advise you to start with Ubuntu because, in my opinion, is the easiest distribution to use and has a ton of documentation and a big supporting community.

Don't you believe I don't use Linux because it doesn't like me, but basically I don't use it because I have failed to install it. The first time I tried to do it on a reformatted hard drive and likely did something wrong because I was new to the OS installation then (this was the past century!) then I tried to install more than twice throughout the past years but without removing Windows, in an attempt to make a dual partition but, again, I'm probably doing something wrong that is not allowing me to have it running, and I cannot remove Windows because of job concerns.

Edited by MyDigitalpoint
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Interesting article @nytegeek, besides I must say thanks for explaining to us how to get this annoying plugin disabled. You know it comes already packed with Google Chrome so I have been facing hard times getting it crashing over and over.

I believe problems with Flash began when Adobe took over Macromedia because it wasn't so annoying in the early days. Now to make it worst, it installs two versions Flash NPAPI, and Flash PPAPI based on the browser you are using and therefore installing both when you have to use multiple browsers for testing purposes.

Don't you believe I don't use Linux because it doesn't like me, but basically I don't use it because I have failed to install it. The first time I tried to do it on a reformatted hard drive and likely did something wrong because I was new to the OS installation then (this was the past century!) then I tried to install more than twice throughout the past years but without removing Windows, in an attempt to make a dual partition but, again, I'm probably doing something wrong that is not allowing me to have it running, and I cannot remove Windows because of job concerns.

Oh god! I remember the old days when installing Linux was extremely hard haha. I've had similar issues with some computers that won't let me install Linux because of the hardware. The problem is somewhat common I guess, ArchLinux has some documentation for that kind of computers.

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I have been making the case against Flash on any operating system for a number of years now. I even wrote an article over the matter for the Setuix blog. That said, I have always experienced more issues with it from Windows than Linux. Unless needed for work I see no good reason to even use Flash.

http://setuix.com/flash-must-die-make-way-for-better-standards/

Unfortunately, a vast number of popular sites still use Flash, it'll be some time yet before it dies out completely. It's great that Youtube is no longer using it though ^_^ Have a look at this article http://www.fastcompany.com/3049920/tech-forecast/the-agonizingly-slow-decline-of-adobe-flash-player

Personally I've never really experienced a lot issues using Flash on Linux.

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Unfortunately, a vast number of popular sites still use Flash, it'll be some time yet before it dies out completely. It's great that Youtube is no longer using it though ^_^ Have a look at this article http://www.fastcompany.com/3049920/tech-forecast/the-agonizingly-slow-decline-of-adobe-flash-player

Personally I've never really experienced a lot issues using Flash on Linux.

That is an exaggeration. I wouldn't call it a vast majority. It is on a much more rapid decline that it was previously. Alternatives are popping up all over the place. There are developers that are starting non-flash versions of their existing products as well.

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I have never experienced any issues with Adobe Flash on Windows. It works pretty great on my current operating system. I am not sure how it performs on Linux though. I have never tried switching from Windows to Linux before.

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I have never experienced any issues with Adobe Flash on Windows. It works pretty great on my current operating system. I am not sure how it performs on Linux though. I have never tried switching from Windows to Linux before.

And i've experienced them quite recently on W7. After update to v~19 (latest, anyway), it keeps freezing Firefox. D'oh, before I updated, I saw 4 Flash processes. Two of them were version 18 (the previous one) and other two were v11! It scared me, as there was some kind of critical exploit in the older versions and even though i updated Flash, it still was running some old versions in the background. Like what the hell?

Edited by kamix
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There are critical exploits in every version. Adobe can't patch them as fast as they are discovered. Flash is on it's way out for a reason.

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That is an exaggeration. I wouldn't call it a vast majority. It is on a much more rapid decline that it was previously. Alternatives are popping up all over the place. There are developers that are starting non-flash versions of their existing products as well.

What alternatives are being used?  I don't know much about flash other then I really don't like it.  It tends to slow things down or freeze things up.

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There is no good alternative for viewing flash content. There are alternative methods to Flash available for delivering content. HTML 5 is the standard. Many sites are ditching Flash in favor of HTML 5 and those that haven't yet will be soon to follow if they want people to be able to use their sites. Hulu needs to take note and do as Netflix and YouTube have done for example.

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HTML 5

 isn't perfect too. On my older laptops, it can make the fan go nuts. And i'm afraid it can't be optimized or more like nobody cares. If it only had performance of Flash and the rest of its own features, it would be just perfect.

What alternatives are being used?  I don't know much about flash other then I really don't like it.  It tends to slow things down or freeze things up.

There are plugins for browsers like "HTML5 Video Everywhere!" but i don't know how it works exactly and probably it still needs Flash to be installed. You can give it a try, though.

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 isn't perfect too. On my older laptops, it can make the fan go nuts. And i'm afraid it can't be optimized or more like nobody cares. If it only had performance of Flash and the rest of its own features, it would be just perfect.

 

Flash is much more likely eat up CPU cycles and cause problems for older devices than html 5. The whole point is that Flash isn't just a security risk, it's many bugs also degrade performance, often to the point where flash content isn't usable.

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With each upgrade, Flash is getting more and more unstable. I use both Windows and Linux, but I don't use Flash for Linux. I don't know what Adobe's been doing lately, but their recent updates have been getting buggier with each release.

There are some options I've tried for Linux other than Adobe Flash. I tried Pepper Flash for a little while, but it proved to be buggy.

Does anyone know any other alternatives besides Adobe Flash for Linux?

 

 

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The answer is to stop using it. Finding an alternative to access flash content isn't going to help the problem. It needs to die as a standard.

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